Episode 1

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Published on:

13th Apr 2022

Hip Hop Movie Club - Beat Street

Welcome to the inaugural episode of the Hip Hop Movie Club podcast. Your HHMCs Boogie, DynoWright, and JB are discussing BEAT STREET, the 1984 classic starring Rae Dawn Chong, Guy Davis, Jon Chardiet and a who's who of early hip hop artists.

Beat Street on IMDb and Pluto TV

The New York City Breakers and the Rock Steady Crew

"Don't Disturb This Groove" by The System

"1984" ad by Apple Computer, in which we accidentally referenced Orson Welles instead of George Orwell ūü§™

Guy Davis, blues guitarist

The classic breakdance battle at the Roxy

"Highs and Lows with Liv and Rose" podcast

HHMC on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube

Transcript
Speaker:

Yo!

Speaker:

(hip hop beat)

Speaker:

(Bring it! C'mon!)

DynoWright: :

Welcome to Hip Hop Movie  Club, where three old heads put their

DynoWright: :

old heads together to vibe on some  of the most memorable or forgettable

DynoWright: :

hip hop themed movies of  all time (Bring it! C'mon!)

DynoWright: :

and here's HHMC with your HHMCs Boogie,  JB and DynoWright. (Bring it! C'mon!)

me to season one, episode one:

Beat Street.

JB:

Beat Street released in 1984 is a  quintessential 80s east coast hip hop film,

JB:

contains all the elements of early hip-hop  culture: the music, the breakdancing,

JB:

the artwork in the form of graffiti, the entire  b-boy lifestyle was introduced there. The movie

JB:

itself features a young man Kenny and his younger  brother Lee and their friends Ramon and Chollie

JB:

as they hoped to make a name for themselves in the  South Bronx of New York during the infancy of hip

JB:

hop as we know it today. Wrought with beat boxes,  spray paint cans, house parties, the club scene,

JB:

breakdancing and legendary cameo hip hop artist  appearances, Beat Street's like stepping into a

JB:

museum of early east coast hip hop culture. It  should be required watching for people of all

JB:

ages that consider themselves fans of the hip hop  genre. It's a definition of the b-boy era in a

JB:

coming-of-age story about the young crew. Keep in  mind this is 1984 and this is an instant classic.

JB:

So what did we like about this  film? Want to kick us off, Boogie?

Boogie:

Okay so this is one of my favorite  movies growing up. I cannot tell you how

Boogie:

many times I've watched this movie. I love  that it incorporated the four elements of hip

Boogie:

hop and it came across as really authentic.  Start with the main character Kenny he was

Boogie:

a DJ and he was also dubbed as one of the  early versions of an MC, hyping the crowd.

Boogie:

There were also other DJs featured throughout  the film you also have various stages of the MC,

Boogie:

including those who ran at the local  clubs and also to the well-established

Boogie:

Roxy night club. And you had your local girl  group that performed at the house parties.

Boogie:

The breaking was top-notch you know what the  Magnificent Force, the New York City Breakers

Boogie:

and the Rock Steady Crew all make cameos in  this film. All classics. And then you have Ramon

Boogie:

who was just a local graffiti artist but he  put his burners on the subway cars and walls

Boogie:

and even the jealousy element you have the guy  Spit who came across and defaces the artwork. You

Boogie:

have all four elements of hip hop you got the MC,  your DJ, your MC, you had your breakdances, your

Boogie:

B-Boys and you also had your graffiti artists.  That was one of the main things I liked about it.

JB:

Nice, Boogie. Yeah, I agree. I  mean it had everything that that you'd

JB:

want to see and that was a lifestyle  back then, that's what kids would do

JB:

and like I said I like that it's like a coming  of age story, you know. These young guys,

JB:

they're trying to make a name for themselves.  It's not a glamorous life, it's tough.

JB:

It's tough out there on the streets but you see  Ramon who had fathered a child with his girlfriend

JB:

and he's learning the way the ways of the  world in terms of he's finally getting

JB:

to the point where he he's becoming a man and  trying to be responsible and he ends up getting

JB:

a job and not only just doing his artwork. But  he becomes a man and unfortunately tragedy hits

JB:

towards the end and they lose him but you see that  community all come together and support. It's a

JB:

brotherhood, it's a whole family and that whole  culture was all about that. I really enjoyed it.

DynoWright:

I enjoyed it too and having never  seen it before which is crazy because it's a

DynoWright:

classic and I missed out on it. But it was really  cool to see all these early hip hop legends, it

DynoWright:

was a lot of famous rappers I've listened to for a  long time but never really seen on screen and all

DynoWright:

of that. I did have to watch the credits again to  see who was who because there were so many of them

DynoWright:

but it was really fun to see. And  we can talk about this later but

DynoWright:

we see Kool Moe Dee without his sunglasses,  like I didn't recognize him without it.

DynoWright:

I didn't recognize him without his  sunglasses. So it was a lot of fun stuff i

DynoWright:

really liked in this movie, early hip  hop who's who, at least the rappers.

JB:

Yeah for sure. So Boogie you can expand upon  this a little bit more. There's Doug E. Fresh

JB:

who was he is the best beat boxer ever, he  was there. And then the Treacherous Three

JB:

is where Kool Moe Dee got started, so you  want to go through who those artists were?

Boogie:

a quick rundown of some of  the cameos, you got Afrika Bambaataa,

Boogie:

the Soulsonic Force, you had DJ Jazzy  Jay, you got the Us Girls who consist of

Boogie:

Lisa Lee, Debbie D and Sha-Rock. Sha-Rock  originally from the Funky Four Plus One,

Boogie:

original mother of hip hop. Kool Herc one of the  fathers of hip hop, if you don't know who Herc is,

Boogie:

Google is your friend. The Treacherous Three,  Kool Moe Dee, Special K and L.A. Sunshine. Of

Boogie:

course we mentioned Doug E. Fresh. We have  Grandmaster Melle Mel and the Furious Five,

Boogie:

Grandmaster Flash and then you have Brenda K.  Starr, Wanda Dee and The System. You don't know

Boogie:

who The System are, look them up as well,  Google is also your friend. Theme song

Boogie:

to "Coming to America", "Don't Disturb This  Groove" they put some nice classics out, yes.

DynoWright:

Yeah "Don't Disturb This  Groove" is one of the best songs ever.

Boogie:

Yeah from the opening riff  that guitar, yeah. (Laughing.)

JB:

Yeah with DJ Kool Herc, he was featured  prominently in the Netflix show "Hip Hop

JB:

Evolution" and he's pretty much brought  the sound systems and the house parties.

JB:

He was hustling before anybody else and  bringing hip hop to the masses in New York and

JB:

people call him sometimes the Godfather  of Hip Hop, you know you may not

JB:

know his name as much as you know some  of the original hip hop groups you know

JB:

like the Sugar Hill Gang and Run D.M.C. but  DJ Kool Herc deserves just as much credit.

JB:

That was awesome that he was he played a role in  there at the Burning Spear nightclub where Kenny

JB:

really got his big break in front of the talent  agent. The music was great. I love also that

JB:

the music is not just you know about the beats and  scratches but there's a lot of strength and power,

JB:

political commentary in the lyrics. I like at  the very end as very uplifting I think it was

JB:

Grand... was it Grandmaster Melle Mel you  know they they had we're talking about

JB:

yeah talking about you know they talk about Iwo  Jima, they talk about Vietnam, they talk about

JB:

all these wars, right? And then they talk about  egomaniacs controlling the self-righteous,

JB:

learning from the past, working for the future.  And then they're inspiring the children in

JB:

the audience, the young folks saying listen,  you're the future so uh grab it by the horns.

DynoWright:

There was a reference to being a slave  to a computer which is funny because it's in 1984.

Boogie:

Just took the words right out of my  mouth, don't be a slave to your computer, yep!

DynoWright:

And now look at  us doing this on computers.

DynoWright:

Everyone has a computer in their pocket.  If they only had known back then.

JB:

Yeah it's uh well 1984, right that's when that

JB:

epic ad came out from Apple based on Orson  Welles' 1984 right? and yeah saying you know so

JB:

the future was you know they were  foretelling the future there for sure.

DynoWright:

People should remember 1984 isn't  that far from the end of the Vietnam War

DynoWright:

so, something on people's minds back

DynoWright:

that then, that Melle Mel is still  talking about it. It was a relevant thing.

Boogie:

Yeah.

JB:

Yeah, also you know that there were incidents  in within the movie that super poignant again

JB:

today. If you you see what's happening  where Lee gets uh you know arrested along

JB:

with some other folks with just really dance  fighting, right? And it was literally like a

JB:

racial profiling of these folks and they just  get locked up. His mother has to come bail him

JB:

out. They were doing no harm to anybody and  you know this obviously still happens today.

JB:

It's revealed that by Kenny and Lee's mother  at the breakfast scene I believe. And it also

JB:

later on when when Kenny is courting  Tracy that he lost an older brother

JB:

Franklin when he got caught up in the gang  scene and the cops came in and his his words

JB:

you know "folks got wasted and my brother  was one of those' so very relevant to today.

Boogie:

Yeah there were there were a lot of  little easter eggs planted throughout the movie

Boogie:

too. There was another scene that that always  sticks out with me and every time I hear it

Boogie:

it kind of resonates with me because I know some  of the history of what was going on in the Bronx

Boogie:

at the time. One of them was as you mentioned  with the scene with Franklin being wasted by

Boogie:

with the gang violence and there  was another one when they first

Boogie:

were having a house party and and Henry was  downstairs banging on the pipes and they went

Boogie:

downstairs see where the noise was coming from  and he was telling him that he was looking for

Boogie:

for his friend that he served in the military with  and they were standing you know there was a fire

Boogie:

and you know immediate response was he was in  a fire and he said no the building was on fire

Boogie:

the landlord set the building on fire five times.  And you know that was very prevalent in that time

Boogie:

frame and you know there was always the phrase  "The Bronx is burning" - you know, the landlords

Boogie:

were setting their buildings on fire to commit  basically insurance fraud you know they were they

Boogie:

were getting payouts and they were skipping out  and you had all of these abandoned buildings some

Boogie:

of them were still standing some of them were in  ruin but you get this layout as if there's a war

Boogie:

torn country in the middle of New York,  in the Bronx because these buildings

Boogie:

were getting burned down so these landlords  could collect money. And that's the little

Boogie:

small easter egg that they planted in there but  every time I hear it it always resonates with me

Boogie:

because it took a long time for the Bronx to  recover and i mean even Brooklyn same thing.

JB:

Yeah way to drop the knowledge there,  Boogie, that's that's good knowledge.

DynoWright:

Shout out to BX! Boogie: X!

DynoWright:

(Laughing) JB:

DynoWright:

I was wondering you know we try  to analyze these movies and like

DynoWright:

I said a lot of stuff is still on point and  relevant but you know I do have to mention

DynoWright:

there was one scene that was I guess was a little  bit cringe-worthy with a homophobic aspect of it

DynoWright:

with the Santa Claus scene where they did a rap.  It was hilarious in terms of the concept, in terms

DynoWright:

of jingle jangle for the poor, you know. They're  talking about Santa not coming through and giving

DynoWright:

them a G.I. Joe, a G.I. Joe toy but, you know,  if they had to redo it, i'm sure they would have

DynoWright:

reworded it. You know there was a part where he  inferred that the G.I. Joe figure was gay and then

DynoWright:

it was inferred that his his sexuality  was questioned, things like that.

DynoWright:

But remember it was back ‚Äďnot that it's¬† ever acceptable‚Äď back then it was a lot

DynoWright:

more commonplace but obviously if they had to do  it again they would remove that scene overall.

DynoWright:

1984 is close to  the beginning of the AIDS crisis

DynoWright:

which affected a lot of gay men, not that it  was an excuse to have those comments in there,

DynoWright:

but a lot of people weren't aware of gay culture  and so that's what it was like back then.

DynoWright:

There was a lot of this  homophobic stuff going around.

Boogie:

Yeah. A lot of  uncertainty, a lot of stereotypes.

JB:

Yep.

Boogie:

A lot of stigmas.

DynoWright:

Right.

JB:

But overall if you go back to the Santa, it  was it was funny they're calling him a drunk,

JB:

they're cursing, they're dropping the f-bomb at  him and I was like that's pretty pretty funny

JB:

and uh well before the uh the Bad Santa  movies with Billy Bob Thornton and stuff

JB:

like that so kind of, uh cutting edge in terms  of the, the concept. No one badmouthed Santa.

Boogie:

That's one of my favorite scenes though  because just out of the pure concept of them,

Boogie:

you know taking shots at Santa Claus for for  not getting what they wanted like so so much

Boogie:

so much so that i actually have a t-shirt  with that scene on the front of it (laughing).

DynoWright:

Is that right? JB: That's right.

Boogie:

I almost, I forgot  to put it on today but um

Boogie:

yeah I'll pass it around one time for one of  the other episodes you can get a glance at it.

DynoWright:

You should send us a picture  of that, put it in our Instagram Stories.

JB:

Yeah, yeah that that's a great idea. Yeah  I mean there was some there were some humorous

JB:

things throughout the film which which made me  crack a smile. Obviously the fashion back then

JB:

we always laugh at now. What we were wearing in  the 80s, right, we laugh at our old pictures back

JB:

in the 80s. But the fashions that the Us Girls  were wearing and some of the other folks. However,

JB:

you know this set the stage for kids are still  wearing these, there's Kangol hats, there was um

JB:

you know sideways caps, the loose fitting  pants, parachute pants and things like that.

JB:

You know, Puma sneakers and whatnot. I also  thought some of the dialogue was was just

JB:

really funny to break things up. There was  a scene with Kenny was jawing with with

JB:

Ramon and then Chollie actually I think it was  Chollie that was jawing with Ramon and Kenny

JB:

breaks it up by pretending to be a newscaster  and just laughing his way through it, right?

Boogie:

(laughing)

JB:

Providing humor and uh yeah that was  good and I like Kenny and Lee's mother uh

JB:

rapping at the breakfast table a  little bit too, telling him hey

JB:

eat your eggs before I break your legs, so little  little things like that were cracking me up.

Boogie:

Yeah the one who played his  mother, Mary Alice, she's a gem.

Boogie:

She's played a mother in a  bunch of movies that I've seen

Boogie:

and it's always good to see her on screen. She's  always brings a little bit of wit to her role.

JB:

Yeah. Yeah that's great so while we get into a  little bit of that as well is some of these actors

JB:

and actresses, right? You may have recognized  them from other things or maybe you didn't know

JB:

about them but uh Guy Davis who plays Kenny was  the son of activists, writers, prominent figures

JB:

in African American culture Ossie Davis and  Ruby Dee. I mean that that's just remarkable.

Boogie:

Yeah.

DynoWright:

He's an accomplished blues guitar  player, which I should have known, being a

DynoWright:

guitar player. But I didn't know (yeah) he's an  actual musician in the movie and in real life.

Boogie:

Yeah my mom told me that.

Boogie:

She actually came across him on  something, might have been Facebook

Boogie:

and um I think she used to communicate with him  on there as well, yeah. He's an actual musician.

JB:

Yeah and as Boogie mentioned the breakdancing  crews were famous crews at the battle at the Roxy,

JB:

New York City Breakers and the Rock Steady Crew  and uh that was an epic scene at the Roxy for

JB:

sure. There were a few different dance scenes that  it you got to check them out even if you just pull

JB:

up the clip on YouTube put in Beat Street break  dancing at the Roxy that is well worth your time.

Boogie:

Yeah that that's probably one of the most  iconic breakdancing battles ever caught on film,

Boogie:

in a movie. Just amazing amazing footwork. Of  course it had to be the battle ending with the

Boogie:

iconic Crazy Legs removing the sneakers and going  into a crab walk that was amazing (laughing).

JB:

And that was like the  mic drop moment right there.

Boogie:

Basically yeah that was  the mic drop right there (laughing)

JB:

But also co-produced, the movie was  co-produced by Harry Belafonte which we

JB:

were talking about and we didn't realize that  or maybe we had forgotten it to the recesses of

JB:

our mind. But the legendary Harry Belafonte  ,you know he put this, he put this on film.

JB:

And he wanted to portray ‚Äďhe's from that¬† area‚Äď the South Bronx and he wanted to just

JB:

say, this is the culture and put it out there  on film. And help to inspire a lot of folks.

Boogie:

Yeah. Directed by Stan Lathan. You know,  coincidentally a few hours ago I was upstairs

Boogie:

watching a comedy special and who of course  produced it was Stan Lathan. He produced uh

Boogie:

all these iconic comedy shows, Def Comedy  Jams. This one I happened to be watching

Boogie:

was uh was Earthquake. You got Chappelle and  and you know Chris Rock, all these iconic

Boogie:

performances, he's been a producer for those. And  also you know father of Sanaa Lathan (laughing).

JB:

Yeah well Dave Chappelle's  Real Husbands of Hollywood,

JB:

I saw. If you look up his history  he's done a lot of great work.

Boogie:

He has an impressive track record, yeah.

JB:

And father of Sanaa, right?

Boogie:

Yep, future father-in-law.

Boogie:

(Laughing)

JB: :

JB: :

Actress Sanaa Lathan and who's quite the looker  and uh yeah she's quite accomplished herself.

JB: :

Another fun fact the role of Robert who was¬† Tracy's boss at the ‚ÄďI'm going to call it‚Äď

JB: :

the community center for the arts, right, it  was played by Duane Jones who was was Ben,

JB: :

prominent figure in "Night of Living Dead"  that was interesting fact that I discovered.

Boogie:

Yeah. And of course we got Tracy.

JB:

Yeah yeah you want to talk about Tracy?

Boogie:

Yeah Tracy, who's played by Rae Dawn Chong  who is the the daughter of the iconic comedian

Boogie:

and partner of Cheech and Chong, Mr. Tommy Chong.  Like she's been in a bunch of movies as well um

Boogie:

in the 80s and um some some good roles so um  yeah it's always good to see her on screen. You

Boogie:

know this is probably one of probably one of her  earlier roles but she had a very important role

Boogie:

as well because she was one of the people  who kind of brought hope to the crew. You

Boogie:

know they were all looking to make their way  and just by pure coincidence and being in the

Boogie:

right place at the right time and crossing paths  with Lee. She started off a little bumpy but she

Boogie:

actually ended up providing some hope and gave  Kenny some assistance in making his envision

Boogie:

making his vision on how to memorialize  and commemorate the life of Ramon, helped

Boogie:

him bring that to fruition. So she played a very  important role in the movie from my perspective.

JB:

Yeah for sure they realized they  have a lot in common because she was a

JB:

composer, she was a choreographer and she was  looking at the music musical aspect of it well

JB:

they were able to collaborate because uh Kenny  was DJ as well. Towards the end when you know

JB:

Melle Mel does the iconic Beat Street song  and the tribute to Ramon and following that

JB:

you see a minister come out on the stage and  tell the kids to believe it, right? And that

JB:

minister is played by Bernard Fowler who if you  don't know has a long history with the Rolling

JB:

Stones as a backup singer he's quite accomplished  as well. Very star-studded cast overall.

JB:

In another musical tidbit  for the younger generation,

JB:

Biggie...Notorious B.I.G. had a song called  "Suicidal Thoughts" and he actually has a

JB:

line in his song that references Beat  Street, says "should I die on the train

JB:

tracks like around my own Beat Street people  at the funeral front and like to miss me"

JB:

so there's been a couple other songs that  reference Beat Street and it holds up to this day.

Boogie:

Absolutely.

Boogie:

(Music)

JB: :

JB: :

So I also wanted to ask you guys, Boogie and  DynoWright, do you think this movie could be

JB: :

made again today? If so, how?

Boogie:

I think that it could because I think in  this day right now there's a big, I mean there's

Boogie:

this there's a lot of a thirst for retro programs  and the retro look and just everybody wants the

Boogie:

retro everything. And even you look at some  of the shows and the movies that are coming

Boogie:

out now they're all like remakes or revisiting  old iconic shows and movies that we grew up on,

Boogie:

things like that. There was a show that was  on Netflix, unfortunately it was canceled,

Boogie:

it was called The Get Down. If you ever  get a chance to check that out, if you

Boogie:

haven't that's a great show. It actually it's  fiction but it takes place in the Bronx as well

Boogie:

and it kind of starts off with the beginning of  how hip hop started with these actual the parties

Boogie:

and they actually references Kool Herc and  a couple of other guys, prominent figures

Boogie:

from that time throwing these parties and who's  going to go to these parties. And it also talks

Boogie:

about the the night that the Great Blackout of New  York where there was a lot of looting and everyone

Boogie:

became DJs because they were able to get their  hands on some good equipment (laughing) but...

JB:

I remember seeing (sorry about that).

Boogie:

Yeah but that show it was so great, it was  such a great show. I think because of that show

Boogie:

becoming so iconic and having such a strong  following that I mean if you were to even imagine

Boogie:

you know mention putting Beat Street out there  I think that you know the world will gobble it

Boogie:

up. I mean you don't even have to call it  Beat Street you can call it something else

Boogie:

but it would have the same premise but  yeah I think, I think it would hold up.

JB:

I totally agree and in fact I know how it  could work if we pitch this or someone pitches

JB:

this to Lin-Manuel Miranda, right? Because I  love the confluence of the cultures you have

JB:

Ramon who who's of Puerto Rican descent, you  have the young African American kids, and you see

JB:

even some Spanish songs, right? I know Lin-Manuel  Miranda was influenced by old school hip hop. You

JB:

see it obviously throughout Hamilton which is all  hip-hop which was just a brilliant idea and just

JB:

to this day is just super successful, made a ton  of money and got a lot of more people into hip

JB:

hop and American history. You know Beat Street  is all about a huge part of American history

JB:

with the B-boy era in the early hip hop and so  like I think it could be done just like this,

JB:

and I think people would love it. He  could just enhance upon some of the songs

JB:

and I mean great I mean if you think about it  Steven Spielberg just remade West Side Story.

Boogie:

Right.

JB:

Which if i'm not mistaken set like in  the 50s and he didn't modernize it which

JB:

I love. It was not like you know we're  going to do a different twist on it and

JB:

stuff like that. He had it like exactly  so we can preserve this and just add it

JB:

what if we put it into like 4K you know  and have these personalities and have

JB:

cameos from from these same legends that made  their appearances that would be incredible.

Boogie:

Yeah i think it would work.

JB:

Yeah.

Boogie:

I think you want to get  Steven on the phone (laughing)

JB:

(Laughing) Exactly.

DynoWright:

I think the movie could be remade. I  think you can remake this movie but I don't think

DynoWright:

you can make this movie as a new film today. The  culture is not new anymore it's like 40 plus years

DynoWright:

old now. This movie was like a clarion call like  here's this new culture and here's this new thing

DynoWright:

that people don't know about and it's  going to become bigger and bigger

DynoWright:

so for that reason, I think. I don't know  what's going on underground right now that

DynoWright:

would become as big as hip hop and could  make a movie similar to Beat Street on that.

Boogie:

Right.

DynoWright:

Newer filmmaking techniques you  know maybe not modernizing it like Spielberg

DynoWright:

did with West Side Story you know? This is like  16 years before like bullet time in The Matrix.

DynoWright:

It'd be interesting to see how they would remake  this film with modern filmmaking techniques.

DynoWright:

I'm not sure how you would make a film as a brand  new statement about an emerging culture right now.

Boogie:

Right.

DynoWright:

You could say that hip  hop is the last great big American

DynoWright:

cultural export of this scale since jazz.

Boogie:

Yeah.

JB:

It's funny you mentioned exports. I was  reading how this film specifically had a big

JB:

influence on German culture, the youth in  Germany as the Berlin Wall, you know in the

JB:

tensions between East and West Germany and this  is something that really united the youth and gave

JB:

them something to to embrace back then so that  that really brought hip hop over in the dancing,

JB:

breakdancing to that part of Europe for sure. So  yeah I'm glad you used that term export there.

JB:

So Boogie is the DJ of our crew here literally  he has a DJ business, doing it for years. Did

JB:

you own the soundtrack for Beat Street  and if not would you, would you buy it?

Boogie:

I absolutely owned it and I was trying to  look, I don't have it in my stack over there it's

Boogie:

actually sitting in my mom my mom's house. I have  a collection that that I keep at my mom's house

Boogie:

but if you look at the picture (oops) get it there  (oops) that's not it where is, it at I just had it

Boogie:

where is it? I just had it there we go.

DynoWright:

Levi's showing it to us on his phone.

JB:

Yeah. yeah.

DynoWright:

He's got the vinyl!

Boogie:

That's volume one.

DynoWright:

You have volume two too?!

Boogie:

Volume two!

DynoWright:

Wow I read that this was the  first movie that had a two volume soundtrack.

Boogie:

Yeah, it probably was  because I know a lot of my other

Boogie:

soundtracks it was just like one  one right one record or it would

Boogie:

it might have a double album but  it would all be in one one sleeve.

DynoWright:

Right.

Boogie:

Yeah I had two two separate sleeves  I've owned those albums since the movie came

Boogie:

out (laughing) and they stay still play maybe a  little bump in the road here and there but they're

Boogie:

still pretty good in pretty good condition  so yeah by all means that's the soundtrack.

DynoWright:

We'll put that  in our Instagram Stories.

JB:

Yeah I love the nostalgia.  Was there anything that you guys

JB:

didn't like or or felt was lacking in the film?

Boogie:

You know what there was a little hokiness  in it occasionally but I think that's just as I

Boogie:

watch it as an adult. I mean as a child it  was the greatest thing since sliced bread.

Boogie:

I didn't see much humor in it, it was more so  this movie is great oh my god my mind is blown.

Boogie:

Mid-40s now I watch it now and of course  I could see some of the funny stuff in it

Boogie:

that wasn't intentional but if you watch any 80s  film in your mid-40s you're going to find some

Boogie:

things in it that are humorous even though they  weren't meant to be so but that's probably about

Boogie:

it. Yeah that's probably about it with me but  even those little little nuances aren't enough

Boogie:

to detract away from the classic status  that I have with Beat Street (laughing).

JB:

Yeah I mean the only thing I mentioned before  is you know the the unfortunate the homophobic...

Boogie:

Oh yeah.

JB:

slur which I know is important and uh but  again we've progressed so much as a culture

JB:

we're so as a whole we're open-minded  obviously there's very large pockets

JB:

of folks that are not open-minded right  and not embracing all walks of life all

JB:

sexual orientations and et cetera but that one  obviously they they need a mulligan for that one.

JB:

I really enjoyed it so much that the only thing  that I thought was lacking was that I wish there

JB:

was like an epilogue or where are they now because  there was while there was uh two parts to the

JB:

soundtrack, there was not a sequel to Beat  Street, right? So I would love to know,

JB:

did Kenny and Tracy's romance flourish? Did they  eventually get married? Did they open up a school

JB:

and studio to inspire young dancers and hip hop  artists? That would be awesome. Did Lee go on

JB:

to dance for like a Broadway show or something?  Did he take his break dancing act on the road?

JB:

Chollie you know promoting everybody et  cetera. I'd love to see a follow-up on that.

Boogie:

Yeah, like did Chollie  eventually own the Roxy nightclub?

Boogie:

(Laughing)

JB:

He had moxie to walk into the Roxy like that

DynoWright:

(laughing)

JB:

And just kind of lay it down I'm  in charge here. He was convincing.

Boogie:

Yeah.

DynoWright:

The thing i didn't like about the  movie aside from the homophobia was there was

DynoWright:

some character development that ‚Äďand i'm not a¬† professional film critic so listeners hit us up‚Äď

DynoWright:

but we mentioned Spit who was the rival graffiti  artist that would deface other people's burners

DynoWright:

and murals and those things. He plays a pivotal  role in the movie but we don't really know

DynoWright:

about him, we don't really find out much  about him. Maybe he was just supposed to

DynoWright:

be part of the environment that they're supposed  to deal with. He's based on a real person if we

DynoWright:

go through Style Wars, that documentary about  graffiti, you see is based on a character in

DynoWright:

that film. But if you haven't watched Style  Wars then you wouldn't know this so I felt

DynoWright:

like i needed more meaning behind Ramon dying  because he was fighting with Spit in the subway.

DynoWright:

And for that matter Robert, you know, Tracy's  boss - I was confused by the relationship

DynoWright:

I think I see them kissing in one scene or she  kissed him and it made Kenny jealous, so I felt

DynoWright:

like something that it wasn't developed much, the  sort of love triangle going on there and so I was

DynoWright:

confused by it a little bit. Maybe the listeners,  maybe you can explain it to me (laughing).

JB:

That's true. Yeah I didn't, I caught that

JB:

relationship. I didn't know it was a hug or a  kiss but it was something that was kind of like

JB:

maybe more accepted back in the day you know with  this you know you know 70s for sure and maybe

JB:

early 80s or secretaries yeah I understand that  lacked a little bit of storyline for sure, yeah.

DynoWright:

Maybe it was cut for time but

DynoWright:

those two things I would have  liked some more on on those.

Boogie:

Yeah yeah I think Ramon he just he dropped  a quick hint about Spit. They said he he said

Boogie:

something along the lines that he used to create  artwork out there and nobody really liked it.

DynoWright:

Ah.

Boogie:

And so that point, from that point on he'd  just go around writing his name on other people

Boogie:

stuff but yeah but it didn't, it wasn't much I  think it was maybe like a couple of lines and that

Boogie:

was it so I do agree that we probably could you  know give them a little more character development

Boogie:

so we kind of get a little bit more about you know  what he was doing but they were definitely, I've

Boogie:

definitely seen instances of that happen in my own  neighborhood uh with people putting up you know

Boogie:

burners and people coming along and just writing  their name across it and um yeah (laughing)

DynoWright:

(Laughing) It's  hard out here in the streets.

JB:

Yeah.

JB:

(Music)

JB:

So guys what do we think the overall rating  and I think what we'll do for the ratings for

odcast is we have two choices:

bring that  funky flick back (bring that funky flick back)

odcast is we have two choices:

or leave it in the vault (leave it in the vault)  so Boogie what would you say for this one?

Boogie:

Ha ha, bring that  funky flick back! (Laughing)

JB:

DynoWright, whaddaya you got?

DynoWright:

Bring it back!

JB:

yeah I'm with you, bring that funky  flick back, bring that funky flick back!

JB:

So yeah we we all like this and we think this  as I mentioned in the beginning this should be

JB:

required viewing Hip Hop 101 for those that love  the genre for those that want to learn about it.

JB:

(Theme music)

JB:

There you have it.

DynoWright:

We did it guys! We did it.

JB:

Yep.

DynoWright: :

DynoWright: :

Hip Hop Movie Club is produced by your HHMCs  JB, Boogie and DynoWright. Music by Boogie.

DynoWright: :

Thanks to Liv and Rose from  the Highs and Lows with Liv

DynoWright: :

and Rose podcast. Go check them  out and subscribe to their show.

DynoWright: :

Special thanks to Susan Berger,  Towanda Edwards and Alice Seneres.

DynoWright: :

Hit us up at hiphopmovieclub@gmail.com or on  Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @hiphopmovieclub.

DynoWright: :

You can also check us out at hiphopmovieclub.com.  The next episode of Hip Hop Movie Club podcast

DynoWright: :

drops in two weeks. Subscribe today in your  favorite podcast app so you won't miss it.

DynoWright: :

Please do share this with a friend. Shout out  to you listeners. Don't hate, congratulate!

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About the Podcast

Hip Hop Movie Club
Celebrating and re-examining old and new hip hop-themed films
This show is for Gen X hip hop fans who want to relive the glory days and reconsider classic and modern hip hop films from a current day perspective. Together we explore some of the societal issues raised in these films, discuss fascinating trivia, and suggest whether this film is worth your time. In any case, you'll be a smarter hip hop fan by the end of each episode.

HHMC is brought to you by a trio of longtime hip hop fans: JB, an 80s and 90s nostalgia junkie, Boogie, a veteran DJ and graffiti artist, and DynoWright, serial podcaster and filmmaker.